Glacier City Gazette | Glacier Valley Gazetta: A Glimpse into the Past
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Glacier Valley Gazetta: A Glimpse into the Past

Glacier Valley Gazetta nameplate

Glacier Valley Gazetta: A Glimpse into the Past

Glacier Valley Gazetta nameplate

By Marc Donadieu
Glacier City Gazette

The pages of the Glacier Valley Gazetta are a fascinating look into Girdwood 50 years ago. This glimpse into the past comes from Gazetta Vol. 1, No. 2 in June 1967.

Throughout this issue, Editor Hugh Cruikshank Jr. wrote about places to visit and things to do throughout Turnagain Arm and Kenai Peninsula. On page 13, he wrote about Hope’s descent from paradise in the following excerpt.

Undoubtedly, there is a system of land ownership in the village, but it’s not at all apparent to the sightseeing eye. Homes and cabins and old stores are scattered about in such haphazard fashion that Hope seems like a surveyor’s nightmare. But this is something refreshing to see, this day and age. If ‘picturesque’ is not too over-worked a word, then Hope is very picturesque indeed; even the occasional wrecks of vehicles and piles of odds and ends seem somehow appropriate and inoffensive to the eye.

If you happen to notice such things, you’ll note that there’s something very attractive about Hope by its very absence: no poles or power lines. The transmission lines aren’t buried, though. There just isn’t any electricity…If you’re independent enough to live this far off the main arteries, you make your own power, by generator, or you do just as well without…But, unfortunately – we’re informed – electric power is on its way. A line has been surveyed and, sooner or later, the village will be cluttered up with the ugliest of all civilized “improvements”.

This is Hope, a real Alaskan village.