Necropsy of a Juvenile Humpback Whale | Glacier City Gazette
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Necropsy of a Juvenile Humpback Whale

Necropsy of a Juvenile Humpback Whale

Necropsy of a Juvenile Humpback Whale

Necropsy of a Juvenile Humpback Whale

Necropsy of a Juvenile Humpback Whale

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette

A juvenile humpback whale died after being stranded by Turnagain Arm’s receding tide on April 30 near Seward Hwy MP 86. The whale was stranded the previous day as well. The images show Veterinary Emeritus with Alaska Sealife Center Dr. Pam Tuomi and volunteer graduate students conducting a necropsy.

(Top L-R) 1. With the tide rising, the whale was tied off by the tail with rope tied to the guardrail piling; 2-3. Dr. Tuomi cuts into blubber for tissue samples; 4. Removing the eye; 5. Barnacles were removed for tissue samples; 6. Looking into the mouth; 7. Chunks of blubber; 8. A battered eye; 9. A barnacle and mud crusted fin.