Indian Valley Farm | Glacier City Gazette
19070
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Indian Valley Farm

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette In the hydroponic freight farm, plants are hung vertically in 6-foot trays to optimize space. Long strings of lights hang between two trays. The lights are on 18 hours a day as water and nutrients circulate and carbon dioxide is pumped in at a level four times higher than the atmosphere outside of the garden.

Indian Valley Farm

By Marc Donadieu
Glacier City Gazette

This week, Turnagain Arm Pit BBQ is featuring a new menu item – fresh salads with homegrown lettuces. Owners Jack Goodsell and Carol Van de Rostyne recently purchased and shipped the first freight farm in Alaska. Think of a semi-trailer with a hydroponic garden installed inside.

The computer-controlled garden has systems for nutrients, temperature, lights and carbon dioxide, which is pumped in to enhance growth. The rear of the semi-trailer is vertical lined with four rows of hanging trays with long strings of lights between them.

Besides lettuces, there are mustard greens, collard greens, a variety of herbs and lots more. Goodsell is experimenting with a variety of plants to see what works best and what needs tweaking before offering it on the menu.

Goodsell said the garden is part of the restaurant’s move to offer vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options to the restaurant’s clientele and visitors from around the world.

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette In the hydroponic freight farm, plants are hung vertically in 6-foot trays to optimize space. Long strings of lights hang between two trays. The lights are on 18 hours a day as water and nutrients circulate and carbon dioxide is pumped in at a level four times higher than  the atmosphere outside of the garden.

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette
In the hydroponic freight farm, plants are hung vertically in 6-foot trays to optimize space. Long strings of lights hang between two trays. The lights are on 18 hours a day as water and nutrients circulate and carbon dioxide is pumped in at a level four times higher than the atmosphere outside of the garden.

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette Turnagain Arm Pit BBQ Owner Jack Goodsell shows a tray of romaine lettuce inside his freight farm. He said because the romaine is hung vertically, it turns upward when it grows. The leaves are not as tight when grown horizontally but the taste is the same. Goodsell is excited to sell lettuce that has been picked in the past few hours instead of a couple of weeks by the time it arrives in Alaska.

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette
Turnagain Arm Pit BBQ Owner Jack Goodsell shows a tray of romaine lettuce inside his freight farm. He said because the romaine is hung vertically, it turns upward when it grows. The leaves are not as tight when grown horizontally but the taste is the same. Goodsell is excited to sell lettuce that has been picked in the past few hours instead of a couple of weeks by the time it arrives in Alaska.

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette French breakfast radishes

Marc Donadieu / Glacier City Gazette
French breakfast radishes