Headline Reads

3 top stories from home and away

By P.M. Fadden
Associate Editor

WORLD VIEW – Social Media Deemed New ‘Junk Food’
globe-icon-blackAnne Longfield, UK Children’s Commisioner, criticized social media giants’ attempts and methodology to draw children into spending more time online.

According to BBC Education & Technology, industry watchdog Ofcom reported internet to overtake television as the most popular media pastime for children in 2016 in the UK, citing children aged five to 15 are spending 15 hours a week on the internet.

Ms. Longfield has launched a campaign to help parents with the issue, claiming parents should be proctive in stopping their children from internet bingeing over summer holidays.

Ms. Longfield also said children should be helped to understand that sites encourage them to continue use based upon previous online activity.

A 2016 ‘screen time and mental well-being’ study among teenagers suggested moderate use of digital devices may be beneficial.

NATIONWIDE – Robots Go!
united-states-icon-blackAutomation within industrial age American factories continues at a record pace, reports the Washington post.

The decades along transformation described, primarily, as search for cost-cutting and efficiency, is highlighted at one Wisconsin factory exemplifying forces behind an automation shift— the American workforce.

The Wisconsin-based robot replacements not only modernize, but also fill niche employement where reliable human workforce had become difficult to field.

Economists claim American labor shortages stem from low unemployment rate, retirement of baby boomers, younger generations spurning factory work and a workforce experiencing increasing declination of health due to alcohol-induced depression and drug use spikage.

FRONTIER FOCUS – AK-wide Broadband, Fact or Fiction?
alaska-icon-blackGreg Wyler, founder and chairman of satellite startup, OneWeb, shared plans to use Alaska as a proving ground to show it can bring affordable, reliable broadband to some of the world’s most isolated communities.

The launched constellation of satellites, in theory, will reach “every square inch of the world” and start bringing an estimated 4 billion people without internet access online.

OneWeb is promising to be the world’s first provider of universal internet service plans.

Greg Wyler, shared hopes that Alaska would be among the first places in the world to receive the new service. Launching in the small, isolated state market, he said, would allow OneWeb to test and debug its system without disrupting service to a large number of customers.

And, Wyler figures, if OneWeb services can function in Alaska’s tough northern climate, it can work anywhere.